Paul Timpa Photography Blog Photography Tutorials and Tips from Paul Timpa Photography

31Jan/14Off

Where to Photograph in NYC — New York City Photo Opportunities

Best Places to Photograph in NYC

NYC Skyline

NYC Skyline

NYC has amazing photo opportunities around every corner. From skylines and night photography, to portraits, architecture, street photography, and even wildlife, NYC has it all.

This guide to the best places to photograph in NYC will highlight many of the popular locations so you can capture that magic image.
 

Brooklyn Bridge from Brooklyn Bridge Park

Brooklyn Bridge, NYC

Brooklyn Bridge, NYC

Brooklyn Bridge Park is one of the very best places to photograph the Brooklyn Bridge with the NYC skyline in the background. It’s very easy to get there via subway. You can also walk right over the bridge from Manhattan.  Be sure to take your wide-angle lens and your tripod. Sunset and "blue hour" are fantastic times for photos.   Blue hour is the brief period right after sunset, but before it's fully dark.  The photo above was taken shortly after sunset.

As an added bonus for this location, the Manhattan Bridge can be photographed from here.
 

Wall Street, New York Stock Exchange

Wall Street and the area around the NYSE area can be a great place to capture the hustle and bustle of life in the city. The subway goes right to Wall St., so this is another area that is easy to get to.  The photo below was taken from a set of stairs across the street from the NYSE.

New York Stock Exchange -- Wall Street

New York Stock Exchange -- Wall Street

 

Rockefeller Center & Radio City Music Hall

The Rockefeller Center / Radio City area in midtown provides many great photo opportunities.

The photo below of the Rockefeller Center ice skating rink and Christmas Tree was taken during the holiday season in New York.

Rockefeller Center Ice Skating, NYC

Rockefeller Center Ice Skating, NYC

 

This photo of Radio City Music Hall was taken from a tripod at 6th ave and 50th street.

Radio City Music Hall, NYC

Radio City Music Hall, NYC

 

This is the statue of Atlas at Rockefeller Center, with St. Patrick's Cathedral, taken from 5th ave between 50th and 51st streets.

Statue of Atlas, Rockefeller Center, NYC

Statue of Atlas, Rockefeller Center, NYC

 

The following is a street scene in the Rock Center area:

Rockefeller Center and Radio City, NYC

Rockefeller Center and Radio City, NYC

 

From this area, you can also take an elevator to the "Top of the Rock" observation deck which provides incredible views of the city.

 

Skyline from Gantry Plaza State Park

If you’re looking to a get a super-wide skyline shot, Gantry Plaza State Park right across the East River is a great place to do it. You can take the subway (#7 train or G train) to the park. The following NYC skyline photo was taken from Gantry Plaza State Park just after sunset during "blue hour".

NYC Skyline

NYC Skyline

 

South Street Seaport 

The South Street Seaport is a fascinating place with endless photographic opportunities, from the pier to the ships to the river.

South Street Seaport, NYC

South Street Seaport, NYC

 

The photo below of the South Street Seaport was taken from the pedestrian walkway on the Brooklyn Bridge.

South Street Seaport, NYC

South Street Seaport, NYC

 

You can also take photos of the Brooklyn Bridge from the South Street Seaport.  The following photo was taken from the Seaport during the "Waterfalls" art installation.

Brooklyn Bridge, "Waterfalls" art installation

Brooklyn Bridge, "Waterfalls" art installation

 

Times Square

Times Square is of course one of the iconic locations in NYC.  There are countless photo opportunities here, so take your time and explore.

In this more “abstract” shot, my goal was to capture the energy of Times Square. This was a panning shot...

Times Square Taxi, NYC

Times Square Taxi, NYC

 

Grand Central Station

Grand Central Station is one of the major transportation hubs of New York City. 750,000 people pass through every single day! While tripods are not allowed to be set up in Grand Central, there is a short wall by one of the sets of stairs where you can rest your camera to take a long exposure such as the one below.

Grand Central Station, NYC

Grand Central Station, NYC

 

Empire State Building 

There are many places to photograph the Empire State Building, which is located at 34th st and 5th ave. This photo is taken from Brooklyn through the structure of the Manhattan Bridge. You can also get great photos from up close, or from up high such as from the observation deck at “Top of the Rock”, Rockefeller Center.

This photo was taken with a telephoto lens from Brooklyn, near Brooklyn Bridge Park which was discussed above.

Empire State Building through Manhattan Bridge

Empire State Building through Manhattan Bridge

 

Central Park

There are so many wonderful photo opportunities in Central Park.

One of my favorites is of “Literary Walk”.

Central Park, NYC

Central Park, NYC

 

Bow Bridge on "The Lake" provides a peaceful scene to photograph, and is a great place to relax.

Bow Bridge, Central Park, NYC

Bow Bridge, Central Park, NYC

 

The Ramble in Central Park is one of my most favorite places to go, both for photography and for relaxation.  You wouldn't think you could find scenes like this right in the middle of NYC!

The Ramble, Central Park, NYC

The Ramble, Central Park, NYC

 

The Ramble, Central Park, NYC

The Ramble, Central Park, NYC

 

Some other great places to photograph in Central Park are:

* Central Park Boathouse on “The Lake”, where Venetian-style gondoliers transport guests over the lake

* The Great Lawn is a fantastic place to photograph people enjoying the outdoors

* Bethesda Fountain
 

Roosevelt Island

Roosevelt Island is a place where you can get great skylines and bridge photos. You get to Roosevelt Island via the Roosevelt Island Tramway, which is a short “gondola” ride over the East River.  The following photo of the 59th Street Bridge and the Tramway was taken from Roosevelt Island facing Manhattan.

Roosevelt Island Tramway, NYC

Roosevelt Island Tramway, NYC

 

The photo below of the East River was taken from the Roosevelt Island Tramway as it crossed the river.

East River Sailboats, NYC

East River Sailboats, NYC

 

Washington Square Park, Greenwich Village, East Village

Washington Square Park is in the heart of the "Village" area of NYC.  Walking west takes you right into Greenwich Village, while walking east takes you into the East Village.  Both present great photo opportunities.  The photo below is of the arch in Washington Square Park.

Washington Square Park, NYC

Washington Square Park, NYC


 

Columbus Circle

Columbus Circle is on the southwest corner of Central Park, and marks the beginning of the Upper West Side.  The photo below is of the fountains in Columbus Circle.

Columbus Circle, NYC

Columbus Circle, NYC

 

Central Park Zoo

If you want to capture some wildlife photos, the Central Park Zoo provides plenty of opportunities.  As you can see below, even the NYC monkeys are cool.

Central Park Zoo, NYC

Central Park Zoo, NYC

 

Other Photo Opportunities

The locations presented above highlight some of the more popular photo opps. There are of course so many other opportunities in NYC, including the Statue of Liberty and the rest of the boroughs. The photos below are some additional images from around the city.

If you can get up high, you can capture fantastic photos of the rivers and skylines.

East River Sunrise, NYC

East River Sunrise, NYC

 

This is a photo of the skyline reflected in a wine glass.

NYC Skyline in Wineglass

NYC Skyline in Wineglass

 

This photo of lightning over the East River was taken from a tripod.

Lightning over East River, NYC

Lightning over East River, NYC

 

The following two photos of the Brooklyn Bridge were taken from from Brooklyn Bridge Park and from standing on the bridge.

Brooklyn Bridge, NYC

Brooklyn Bridge, NYC

 

Brooklyn Bridge, NYC

Brooklyn Bridge, NYC

 

And lastly, the sun sets over NYC.

NYC Sunset

NYC Sunset

 

There are so many photo opportunities in New York City, you can explore for a lifetime. I've provided just a sampling of photo opps as inspiration for you own photos, and to highlight some of the more popular locations.


For those looking to improve your photography, I've also created an app for iPhone / iPad / Android which teaches photography and how to get photos like these while you're out taking pictures. It's perfect for when you're traveling. Click here:

Photography Trainer for iOS and Android

 
If you find this guide helpful, please share it:

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If you have any questions about the locations or photo techniques, please feel free to ask any time. You can also become a fan at my Photography Facebook page, add me to Google+ circles, or follow me on Twitter for more photography tutorials and tips:

Paul Timpa Photography's Facebook Page

Paul Timpa on Google+


Thanks for reading, and best regards,
Paul

 
If you'd like to purchase prints or stock photography licenses for my photos (for advertising and editorial use), please visit:

http://www.timpaphotography.com/purchase

 
Copyright 2014, Paul Timpa

http://www.timpaphotography.com/

24Jan/14Off

Travel Photography: How to Prepare for Your Trip

Preparing for Travel Photography

Colosseum, Rome, Italy

Colosseum, Rome, Italy

Going on a trip where you'll be taking photos can be one of the most exciting photography experiences you can have. Whether it's simply going on vacation, or a dedicated trip specifically for travel photography, you’ll want to be prepared. This guide will help you get there and highlight some of the things you need to think about.

So let’s get started!
 

Gear

You should always bring all the photography gear you’ll need with you. Assume that you won’t be able to acquire any photo equipment at your destination. While it may turn out that there is a photography shop nearby, it’s better to play it safe. I suggest making a list of all your gear on your computer. Then before every trip you can print it out and check that each item is packed. I go the extra step and actually set everything up, power on the camera, put it on the tripod, etc. This way nothing can be forgotten. (For example, one time I almost left without the quick-release plate for my tripod, something that would have been easy to miss had I not actually tried to mount the camera).

Here is a simple list to get you started:

* Camera
* Camera Battery in the camera + extra batteries
* Battery charger
* Memory Card in the camera + extra memory cards
* Tripod and tripod attachments (e.g. Quick release plates, heads, etc.)
* Remote control for shutter
* Filters + filter holders
* Flash + flash batteries
* Ziploc bag (quick rain protection)
* Cable to connect camera to computer
* Electric plug adapters (for international travel)
* Backup point-and-shoot camera with battery, charger, and memory cards

Take special note of that last item. Cameras can fail, break, or get lost. You don’t want to be on the trip of a lifetime and have your only camera fail, leaving you with no other option to take photos. Always bring a backup camera, even if it’s an inexpensive point-and-shoot. You may not get the highest-quality photos, but at least you’ll have something.

Positano, Italy

Positano, Italy

 

Photo locations

Now for the fun part -- figuring out what you want to photograph at your destination!

There are many ways to determine some of the key "must have" photos from any particular location. I usually use three ways:

First, I’ll simply do some Google searches about the destination to see what comes up. In addition to researching the destination in general, I’ll usually search for something like “Where to photograph in [insert destination]” as well.

Secondly, I’ll buy guide book or two. These are great not only to highlight the key places to see, but are also super helpful overall for things like hotels, restaurants, etc. The popular ones are usually very good, such as Fodor’s, Frommer's, and Lonely Planet.

Lastly, I’ll go to a photo sharing site like Flickr or Google+ and search on the destination to see what’s popular to photograph.

When I get to the destination, I’ll look at the postcard rack to see what else looks interesting, and of course I'll talk to locals to get their input as well.

If you use the methods above, you’ll have a good chance of getting to all the key photo opps.

Once you've identified where you want to photograph, it's time to create the “plan” to get all the photos.

The first thing to do is figure out how many sunrises and sunsets you’ll have, since many of your photographs will likely occur at that time. You’ll get a sunrise & sunset for each full day you’re there, and depending on what time of day you’re traveling, maybe a sunset on the day you arrive, and a sunrise on the day you leave. Subtract out any sunrises / sunsets where you’re doing something besides photography (you might want to have a nice meal along the beach at sunset, y’know!)

Costa Rica Sunset, Mal Pais

Costa Rica Sunset, Mal Pais

Once you know how many sunrises / sunsets you have, just look at your list of photo locations and assign them to the days of your trip. Do the important ones first -- this way if the weather is bad and you don’t get a shot the first day, you can go back the next day and try again. The photos you don’t get to will be the least priority ones.

Especially for the sunrise / sunset photos, I recommend scouting the location in advance during the day. The window for photography at sunrise / sunset is very small. You don’t want to find out on the morning of the shoot that you don’t know where to park, that there’s a huge construction site in front of the location, or any host of other things. Go to the site during the day, confirm you know how to get there, exactly where you’re going to shoot from, etc. Then you can just go to the spot the next day, worry-free, and take the shot.

Use a sunrise / sunset calculator to determine your shooting times. I like the one below -- it also shows “civil twilight” which loosely translates to blue hour.  Enter the location and dates you'll be traveling:

Sunrise / Sunset calculator

Determine if there is a particular direction you need to be facing. For example, the Grand Teton mountains are generally photographed when facing straight west, so they are usually photographed at sunrise when the sun is behind you and shining on the mountains. If you’re trying to get the NYC skyline with the sun rising behind it, you’ll want to be facing east and take the photo from the New Jersey side of the river. If you want the sun setting over the skyline, you need to face west and take the photo from Queens / Brooklyn. These are the types of things to think about.

NYC Skyline

NYC Skyline

Whether it’s a sunrise / sunset photo, day photo, or night photo, group the locations together so you can shoot the ones that are close together on the same day if possible.

Bring a paper map just in case GPS navigation doesn't work. Once I have my photo plan, I’ll use Google maps to get directions from one place to another, and I’ll print those directions to bring with me. Then I don’t have to worry if I don’t get a good GPS signal.

Also put some thought into what locations might be OK to shoot even if the weather is bad. You might not think of a gray rainy day as a worthwhile day for photography, but maybe the location lends itself to black & white photography, so getting warm light isn't necessary.

Don't forget there is more than one way to shoot a popular location, as illustrated below in two very different takes on the Eiffel Tower:

Eiffel Tower, Paris

Eiffel Tower, Paris

 

Eiffel Tower, Paris

Eiffel Tower, Paris

 

Traveling with your gear

Once you've identified everything you’re bringing and you've got your photography plan, it’s time to pack and travel. Traveling with your gear can present its own set of challenges. Firstly, if you’re flying, you must take your camera, memory cards, and accessories with you on the plane as a carry-on. It’s not wise to check your expensive and fragile equipment, that could get lost or damaged. Either put it in your luggage that can go in the overhead bin, or use a photo backpack that you can put under the seat. You can use a compact tripod with four-segment legs that will fit in many carry-on sized pieces of luggage. My four-segment compact tripod is my only tripod and it works great.

Be sure to use a foam-padded backpack or case, or at least wrap your camera in towels or clothes to protect it from the bumps of travels. Put in the center of your luggage, not near the edges where impacts can damage it.

If you’re traveling internationally, be aware of customs rules. There are some rules regarding purchasing equipment in other countries and returning with it, so if possible have a receipt or just some way of explaining that the gear is yours and was not purchased on the trip.

When you get to your destination, always be aware of your camera equipment. Never leave it unattended. If you’re going out on the town without your D-SLR and it fits in the hotel safe, then put it in the safe along with the memory cards.

 
Backup

OK, so you got to your destination, executed your plan, and you captured some amazing photos. Congratulations! Now it’s time to back everything up. It’s incredibly important to backup your images while you’re traveling, as soon as you possibly can after taking them.

The simplest and most familiar way is to bring a laptop and transfer the images to the hard drive. You can also buy a portable memory card backup device with a hard drive, but the laptop has a significant advantage: You can email the photos to yourself, upload to “the cloud”, or burn CDs from a laptop. This is important because if at all possible you should try to have backups that are not with you physically. If all of your backups are in your bag and it gets lost, you’ve lost everything. With a laptop, you can (and should) upload important photos to “the cloud” (a dropbox, your own server, etc.) or at the very least email a few photos to yourself. You can also burn a CD and mail it to yourself if necessary. This way, if something happens to your gear, you’ll still have the images in the cloud, your email, or waiting at home in your mailbox. I also connect an additional portable hard drive to the laptop via USB to create a second copy while I'm there.

Don't plan on using a "public" computer at your destination, such as in the hotel business center or Internet cafe. Often public computers have safeguards that will prevent you from plugging in your camera and/or hard drives.

South Street Seaport, NYC

South Street Seaport, NYC


 

Closing

Travelphotography can be one of the most rewarding types of photography. Not only do you capture memories to last a lifetime, but you get to share those beautiful locations with everyone. Perhaps you might even inspire someone to travel there too.

My last point in this guide is probably the most important: Remember that you’re traveling and experiencing amazing things. Don’t get lost in the photography while forgetting to experience the moment. If there is a stunning sunrise, photograph it, but remember to put the camera down for a few minutes, forget about the photography, and enjoy life.

Enjoy!

Best,
Paul

I've also created an app for iPhone, Android, and iPod Touch which teaches you photography -- more info can be found here:

Photography Trainer for iPhone and Android

Photography Trainer iPhone app

Photography Trainer iPhone app

 
To keep up-to-date with the latest photo additions and other topics, you can become a fan at my Photography Facebook page, add me to your Google+ circles, or follow me on Twitter:

Paul Timpa on Google+


Paul Timpa Photography's Facebook

 
Share this guide:

Share/Bookmark

 
If you'd like to purchase prints or stock photography licenses for my photos (for advertising and editorial use), please visit:

http://www.timpaphotography.com/purchase

 
Copyright 2014, Paul Timpa

http://www.timpaphotography.com/

15Jan/14Off

Where to Photograph in Grand Teton National Park

A Photography Guide to the Grand Tetons

Snake River Overlook, Grand Teton National Park

Snake River Overlook, Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park has some of the most beautiful scenery in the U.S. It's a fantastic place for photography. I've written this guide to highlight some of the best places to photograph in the Grand Tetons.

First, it’s worth understanding the layout of the park. The Teton mountains runs north-south. There are two primary roadways around the park, and both run parallel along the Tetons. Both of these roads are on the eastern side of the mountains, so you’ll be looking westward for your photographs.

This guide focuses on the outer road where you can find many of the most iconic and famous viewpoints of the Tetons. It’s a highway and can be accessed all year round. The inner road also has many viewpoints and will be discussed as well, but note that it is closed in winter.

We’ll start our tour traveling south out of Yellowstone National Park into Grand Teton National Park. All through this guide I’ll include links to the various photography sites on Google Maps, so you’ll be able to find any of the locations even if you don’t follow the route below.

The road that heads into the Tetons from Yellowstone is Hwy 89/191/287. As you drive south from Yellowstone into the Tetons on this road, you’ll first pass Jackson Lake. Here you’ll get your first glimpse of the Tetons up close. FYI, Jackson Lake Lodge is along this route, and you can stop into the lobby to gaze through the large picture windows.

To get to the major photography sites, continue traveling south until the highway splits into the parallel roads that I mention above. These two roads form the Teton loop, along which you can stop to take your pictures.

Here’s the split:


View Larger Map

For any of the maps in this guide, you can send the link to your mobile phone and if your phone supports it, you can use GPS navigation to navigate directly to the site.

The outer road (further from the Tetons) is where many of the popular viewpoints are located, so we’ll start there.

   
Oxbow Bend

To reach the first major photography spot, Oxbow Bend, you’ll travel onto the outer road from the split, so stay on Hwy 89/191/287 as it heads east / south and go one mile.

Oxbow Bend, Grand Teton National Park

Oxbow Bend, Grand Teton National Park

The Oxbow Bend viewing area is very easy to see. The area is right off the main road. You may notice many people photographing right from the parking lot, but the best view is a short walk down to the water's edge. After parking your car, walk north a little bit along the road and you'll see foot trails through the long grass where people have made their way down to the water. If you don't see any trails, just blaze your own -- it's a very short walk down to the water. From there you'll have unobstructed views of the mountains and you'll be able to get beautiful reflections.

The photo above was taken at F8 for 1/160th sec, ISO 100 at 75mm (full-frame equivalent).

Oxbow Bend is here:


View Larger Map

   

Snake River Overlook

The next stop is the famous Snake River Overlook. Snake River Overlook is where Ansel Adams made his iconic photograph of the Tetons.

From this overlook, you're facing West so be there for sunrise. When the sun rises behind you in the east it illuminates the Tetons and the landscape below with a wonderful glow.

Snake River Overlook, Grand Teton National Park

Snake River Overlook, Grand Teton National Park

The area where you can set up your tripod for the best shot is not that wide, so get there early so you can get a good spot.

The above photo was taken with a Canon 5D Mark II on a tripod, F11 for 1/4 sec, ISO 100 at 20mm (full-frame equivalent).

To get here, head south from Oxbow Bend. You’ll reach an intersection after three miles -- continue south onto Hwy 26/89/191 and go about ten miles -- you’ll see the parking lot for Snake River Overlook here:


View Larger Map

You can plan what time in the morning to be there by looking up sunrise times here -- just enter the dates you’ll be photographing:

Sunrise / Sunset times for Grand Teton National Park

 
Schwabacher Landing

Just south of the Snake River Overlook about 4.5 miles is Schwabacher Landing. Schwabacher Landing is a stunning area down off the road and actually on the river, so you can get reflections of the Tetons in the water. As with the Snake River Overlook, you'll want to shoot in the morning when the sun is behind you and illuminating the face of the Tetons.

 

Schwabacher Landing, Grand Teton National Park

Schwabacher Landing, Grand Teton National Park

While there is a dirt road that you used to be able to drive from the highway down to the landing by the water, that dirt road was closed to vehicles when we were there. If that's the case during your visit, you'll need to park along the highway and walk down. It’s not a short walk (about a mile) and while it's not extremely steep, it is long. The incline on the walk back can be tiresome, so be prepared. You may want to bring bear spray as well. Once down on the water, you can walk north along the river for a variety of vantage points.

The above photo was taken with a Canon 5D Mark II on a tripod, F11 for 1/80th sec, ISO 100 at 45mm (full-frame equivalent).

Schwabacher Landing is located here:


View Larger Map

 

Moulton Barn and Mormon Row

To get to Moulton Barn, continue south on the highway about 3 miles until you see Antelope Flats Road. Make a left and follow along Antelope Flats until you come to Mormon Row. Moulton Barn will be to your right, and a few other structures will be to your left.

Moulton Barn, Grand Teton National Park

Moulton Barn, Grand Teton National Park

 

The above photo was taken with a Canon 5D Mark II, F8 for 1/640th sec, ISO 200 at 78mm (full-frame equivalent).

Drive to the right to photograph the famous Moulton Barn, which is located here:


View Larger Map

   

If instead of going right, toward Moulton Barn, you make a left at the intersection, you'll drive a short distance and likely see herds of Bison in the grassy areas on either side of the road. If you can drive so that the Bison are framed by the Tetons in the back, park your car on the side of the road, and capture your images.

Bison, Grand Teton National Park

Bison, Grand Teton National Park

 

The above photo was taken with a Canon 5D Mark II, F9 for 1/640th sec, ISO 200 at 81mm (full-frame equivalent).

The image above was taken here:


View Larger Map

Those are some of the main highlights from the HWY 26/89/191 that is open year-round. Of course there are others, like Cunningham Cabin, so explore.

   
The Inner Road

In addition to the highway, you can also travel the inner road which runs parallel to the highway, but a little closer to the mountains. Starting at the top of the loop, travel west / south onto Teton Park Road:


View Larger Map

There are a variety of photo opps on the inner road, so explore, but I’ll highlight two of the main ones: Signal Mountain and Jenny Lake.
   

Signal Mountain

About 3 miles south of the split, you’ll find the Signal Mountain area, which has a lodge and restaurants. Nearby, you’ll find the road that takes you to the top of the Signal Mountain area, where there are scenic overlooks.

Signal Mountain, Grand Teton National Park

Signal Mountain, Grand Teton National Park

The road to the top can be found here:


View Larger Map

   

Jenny Lake

Continue south for another 14 miles and you’ll reach the beautiful Jenny Lake area.

Jenny Lake, Grand Teton National Park

Jenny Lake, Grand Teton National Park

Jenny Lake is here:


View Larger Map

If you continue traveling south, you’ll eventually reach the bottom of the Teton loop, where you can then turn north and travel the highway where all the photo opps in the previous section are located. All along the way on both roads you’ll pass beautiful scenery, so just stop the car, or hike a little, and explore as much as you can. There are so many amazing photography opportunities.

 
Horseback Riding

If you’re feeling particularly adventurous, you can reach some incredible and off-the-beaten-path vantage points by horseback. We took a 3-hour horseback trip with Swift Creek Outfitters / Teton Horseback Adventures and it was incredible. Our ride was the “Big Pulpit Ride” and it took us way up in the mountains into some gorgeous scenery.

Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton National Park

If that seems interesting to you, their website is here:  Swift Creek Outfitters / Teton Horseback Adventures   

 
Grand Teton National Park is an absolutely amazing place to visit. The photo opportunities for landscape and wildlife photography are virtually endless. The park is just small enough so that it’s not overwhelming, but large enough to provide you with an incredibly wide variety of vantage points. Combined with its close proximity to Yellowstone, it is a fantastic photo destination.

Oxbow Bend, Grand Teton National Park

Oxbow Bend, Grand Teton National Park

 

Best,
Paul

I've also created an app for iPhone, Android, and iPod Touch which teaches you photography -- more info can be found here:

Photography Trainer for iPhone and Android

Photography Trainer iPhone app

Photography Trainer iPhone app

 
To keep up-to-date with the latest photo additions and other topics, you can become a fan at my Photography Facebook page and follow me on Twitter:


Paul Timpa Photography's Facebook

 
Share this guide:

Share/Bookmark

 
If you'd like to purchase prints or stock photography licenses for my photos (for advertising and editorial use), please visit:

http://www.timpaphotography.com/purchase

 
Copyright 2014, Paul Timpa

http://www.timpaphotography.com/